10 Jobs for People Who Love Food

For some of us, few things in life are more satisfying than a great plate of food. The truth is, good food is so much more than just the ingredients and the flavors — it can also create emotions of comfort, joy, and excitement. Since food is such an important part of our lives, it’s no wonder that many people decide to dedicate their careers to creating it.

If you’re the type of person who loves food and you want to have a career where you can be around it as much as possible, there are many options available to you. To help you on your path, we’ve put together a list of ten jobs that are great for people who love food.

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1. Chef

If you’re like me, this was probably the first job you thought of when you saw this list. And that’s alright, because chefs live, breath, and sleep food. They’re not only responsible for developing great menus and making sure that the kitchen runs smoothly — in some cases they also have to take care of scheduling, inventory, and other tasks that aren’t quite as glamorous as serving up a beautiful plate. It can take many years of practice before you’re able to become a chef, but if you love food and want to spend as much time as you can working with it, this could be a great career for you.

2. Nutritionist

You don’t have to cook food or work in a restaurant to have a job working with food. Nutritionists teach people how to use food to help them meet their health and lifestyle goals. For example, they might help an athlete learn how to eat properly while training for a big event, or help a diabetic person learn how to eat foods that will keep their blood sugar from getting too high. If you have a passion for food and feel fulfilled when you’re helping others, then working as a nutritionist could be a good choice.

3. Food Scientist

Most of us aren’t farmers. We rely really heavily on foods that are available to us at the grocery store. And sometimes, we don’t stop to wonder where those foods come from. Who develops them? Who designs them? Who makes sure that they’re safe for us to eat? In most cases, the answer to all of those questions is a food scientist. Food scientists use their knowledge of biology, nutrition, and chemistry to develop foods that most of us rely on each day.

4. Food Critic

Chefs and restaurant owners either love them or hate them (depending on the day), but food critics help the public make informed decisions about the restaurants where they’re thinking of spending their money. Anyone can eat food and talk about it, but it takes a refined palate, years of practice, and a great way with words to develop a successful career in this occupation. With that said, for people who love to eat food (and get paid for it), there are few better jobs in the world.

5. Restaurant Manager

If you love the restaurant lifestyle but find that you’re better suited for logistics and management than working in a kitchen, then a job as a restaurant manager could be a good fit for you. Restaurant managers are responsible for ensuring that all aspects of a restaurant operate smoothly and efficiently. A few of their responsibilities include managing inventory, hiring, firing and scheduling employees, and ensuring customer satisfaction. It’s a big job with demanding hours, but for people, it’s a perfect fit.

6. Cook

Cooks are the heart and soul of most restaurants, and it’s a position where many chefs get their start. Most cooks tart out making simple items in the kitchen (like salads or fried foods), and eventually move on to more senior roles where they can start developing strong skills.Over time, cooks learn just about everything there is to know about restaurant operations, and many end up moving into roles in management.

7. Caterer

If you’re the rare breed of person who loves to cook and enjoys working with clients, then working as a caterer could be a good choice. Caterers provide food and drinks for things like weddings, parties, corporate events, and other events where a large amount of food is required. Working in this occupation can sometimes require a lot of patience, as clients who are planning an important event may take a long time to decide on what they want. Additionally, since many caterers run their own businesses, marketing and bookkeeping skills are needed.

8. Personal Chef

Personal chefs are hired by individuals, families, or companies who need to have someone on hand to cook their food. There are some big advantages to working as a personal chef. They don’t normally have to work the late nights that are so common in the restaurant industry, and if they’re matched with an employer who loves their services, they can enjoy a lot of stability. On the other hand, they may be required to cook multiple meals a day, and days off can be few and far between.

9. Baker

Bakers make foods like cakes, cookies, breads, and pies. They are frequently employed by restaurants, bakeries, grocery stores, and manufacturing facilities. Like all culinary arts, baking takes many years to master. Since young bakers are often viewed as apprentices, you can expect to receive minimal pay during your first few years on the job. However, many bakers who continue to work hard and refine their craft are able to take on more senior roles positions in time, and even start their own bakery as they gain more experience.

10. Waiter / Waitress

Waiters and waitresses are the faces of the restaurants they work in. To work in the best restaurants (where the money is best) waiters and waitresses need to have a deep understanding food. Understanding customer tastes and being able to accurately describe the dishes on the menu is necessary to make expert recommendations on food and wine pairings.

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